What is melanoma in situ?

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Melanoma in situ

Early forms of melanoma are classified as in situ, which means “in place” in Latin. This simply means that the cancer cells haven’t yet spread beyond the epidermis. When melanoma spreads deeper into the skin, into the lymph nodes or organs, it is considered metastasized.

Always do regularly self-checks to be on time in case of malignant melanoma in situ.

There are four stages of skin cancer which increase in severity, with in situ being the first stage. Melanoma in situ is the easiest type to treat. For melanoma in situ treatment options typically, the cancerous area and a border around the area is simply cut out by a doctor and monitored for recurrence.

Treatments for metastasized melanoma, on the other hand, can include radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Based on the type and stage of the cancer, treatment options vary widely and should be discussed thoroughly with a doctor.

Read more about melanoma stages

Preventing melanoma

The best way to prevent Melanoma in situ is to limit your sun exposure and apply sunscreen frequently. Those with fair skin are more at risk for developing melanoma as they have lower amounts of protective melanin (pigment) in their skin.

More on: Preventing melanoma

Those with a family history of melanoma are also more at risk. It’s important to check your body from head-to-toe frequently to detect any dangerous changes in moles or spots early. Self-diagnoses are never 100% accurate, so if you have any concerns about a spot or growth, get in touch with a doctor or dermatologist immediately to have it checked out. While the vast majority of moles and blemishes are not cancerous, it’s always better to be safe than sorry.

> Learn more about the early warning signs of melanoma.

SkinVision Customer Stories

"I think it probably saved my life"
Seonaid Sichel
United Kingdom
"SkinVision gave me the confidence to go and ask the doctor"
William Webber
United Kingdom
"The melanoma could have been on my arm for years"
Andrew Bartlett
United Kingdom
"I’m now under strict watch"
Barry Joblin
New Zealand
"I think it probably saved my life"
Seonaid Sichel
United Kingdom
"SkinVision gave me the confidence to go and ask the doctor"
William Webber
United Kingdom
"The melanoma could have been on my arm for years"
Andrew Bartlett
United Kingdom
"I’m now under strict watch"
Barry Joblin
New Zealand

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